Books vs. Movies

It’s an age-old question: Which is better, the book or the movie?books vs movies blog image

Recently I posed a version of this question to my RCLS colleagues. I wanted to know about their experiences with books that have been adapted for either the large or small screen. Books that were better than movies, movies that were better than books, movies that got them to read books… I wanted to hear about it all.

And they delivered!

Beneath the cut you’ll find reflections from seven different library staff members, each with a slightly different take on the book/movie debate and each with vastly different tastes in media. You’re sure to take away a recommendation of something good to read, watch, or both.

Read More »

31 Books About Witches

by Britney Reed-Saltz

For centuries the witch has been a powerful archetype. Feared or revered, emulated or persecuted, her position in society has evolved throughout history, but one thing has remained certain: her presence.

What better time than now, as Halloween approaches, to sit for a spell and read tales of witchcraft? Whether you prefer fantasy, romance, horror, mystery, or nonfiction, this list will point you to the grimoire you seek.

Garden Spells  Sarah Addison Allen (magical realism, series)witches 1

The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman (magical realism, series)

The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco (fantasy, series)

Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett (humorous fantasy, series)

The Good House by Tananarive Due (horror)

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt (horror)

witches 2The Witch’s Daughter by Paula Brackston (historical fantasy, series)

Bell, Book, and Murder by Rosemary Edghill (mystery, series)

The Witch of Painted Sorrows by M. J. Rose (historical fiction)

Toil and Trouble: 15 Tales of Women and Witchcraft edited by Tess Sharpe and Jessica Spotswood (YA short stories)

The Goblin Wood by Hilari Bell (YA fantasy)

Truthwitch by Susan Dennard (fantasy, series)witches 3

The Witches of New York by Ami McKay (historical fiction)

A Secret History of Witches by Louisa Morgan (historical fiction)

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem by Maryse Condé (historical fiction)

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe (fiction)

Circe by Madeline Miller (historical fiction)

witches 5The Witching Hour by Anne Rice (historical fiction, series)

A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray (YA historical fiction, series)

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor (YA Afrofuturism/fantasy, series)

Sister Light, Sister Dark by Jane Yolen (YA fantasy, series)

The Graces by Laure Eve (YA paranormal fantasy, series)

Book of Shadows by Cate Tiernan (YA paranormal fantasy, series)witches 6

The Wicked Deep by Shea Earnshaw (YA paranormal fantasy, series)

Dance Upon the Air by Nora Roberts (romance, series)

Secondhand Spirits by Juliet Blackwell (cozy mystery, series)

The King of Bones and Ashes by J. D. Horn (urban fantasy, series)

witches 9Dead Witch Walking by Kim Harrison (urban fantasy, series)

A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness (urban fantasy, series)

Drawing Down the Moon by Margot Adler (nonfiction)

Witches of America by Alex Mar (nonfiction)

 

 

 

 

 

Books for Galentine’s Day

by Brittney Reed-Saltz

It’s no secret that February (and most of January, to be honest) is dominated by Valentine’s Day. With the emphasis on romance, other kinds of love get buried under avalanches of mushy cards and more chocolate hearts than anyone could possibly eat.

That’s why I love Galentine’s Day.

galentine's 1

galentine's 2

Created on the TV show Parks & Recreation and celebrated on February 13, it’s a day for, in the immortal words of Leslie Knope, “ladies celebrating ladies.” It’s a time to appreciate and treat your friends, and to recognize the power of women’s friendships.

So this February 13, text your friends some heart emojis. Bake some cupcakes for your work pals. Take your bestie out for brunch. Maybe watch some Parks & Rec. And read about some of my favorite fictional female friendships!

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Everyone focuses on the romantic elements of Austen’s work, often ignoring not only her wry social commentary, but her depictions of friendship. I love Elizabeth and Jane Bennett’s sisterly bond, and the book simply would not be the same without their conversations and their support for one another.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker
In this novel, Celie endures unbearable abuse, but her friendship with her sister  Nettie helps sustain her, and her more-than-friendship with the glamorous Shug Avery helps her to find her own way.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
How could I not include this book? Carmen, Lena, Bridget, and Tibby prove that sometimes our differences make our friendships even stronger. Plus you have to love the body-positive magic of a pair of jeans that different body types feel equally great in.

The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
When you learn that you’re the princess of a small European country, you need a reliable BFF to keep you down-to-earth. Mia Thermopolis has that and more in the passionate, take-no-prisoners Lily Moscovitz. Although their friendship encounters obstacles and setbacks, it ultimately endures.

Giant Days by John Allison
This graphic novel series follows Susan, Esther, and Daisy through the trials of starting university. They have their fair share of squabbles as roommates, but they are always there for each other with laughter, advice, and tough love. You really see their friendship grow over the course of the series, and it’s a funny, heartwarming thing.

Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson
Phoebe is granted one wish by a unicorn, and uses it to make said unicorn her best friend. But she gets a little more than she bargained for in the vain but charming Marigold Heavenly Nostrils. I freely admit to loving this comic as an adult, even though it’s aimed at a middle grade audience, and I think everyone can find something in these stories to love.

Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Linh Cinder and Iko have one of the most unique friendships that I’ve ever read: Iko is an android who loses one body and spends quite a bit of time inhabiting the “body” of a spacecraft, and Cinder is an cyborg. I still need to finish this series–I understand that Iko undergoes even more transformations–but I loved the interactions between the practical-minded mechanic Cinder and the girly, ebullient Iko in the first and second books.

Who are your favorite literary BFFs? Let us know in the comments!

Beth’s 2017 Reading Year in Review

We’re kicking off 2018 by looking back on the best books we read in 2017. Today’s picks come from Beth Elam.

Favorite new author or series you tried:
The Mistborn Trilogy Brandon Sanderson

A book that surprised you:
Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

The best book you read that was also published this year:
Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepety

A book you read that was outside of your comfort zone:
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance

The book that you recommended to the most people:
Poldark by Winston Graham

The best cover from a book you read this year (please include image):  
Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys
image(1)